Tag Archives: Dawg House

Passing the Leash

small dh logo framedHowdy Dawg Blawg followers! We recently emailed out some BIG NEWS through our website (www.dawghouse.biz). Here’s the news about our passing the leash on to some new pack leaders…

Hello everyone,

As stated in the subject of this email—we have some BIG NEWS and big changes coming to Dawg House. We have owned and loved Dawg House since 2004; we have tried to meet everybody’s needs and most of all take the best possible care of the dogs that have been such a large part of our lives. With very mixed emotions, we have decided to sell Dawg House.

This process and its’ outcome have happened very quickly, but we wanted to make sure it was 100% concluded prior to letting you all know. Just to reassure everyone—we would NEVER choose people to continue our legacy without fully approving who they are, and also having the utmost confidence in their abilities.

May 16th (in about two weeks), the new owners will take possession of Dawg House. We (Christopher and Erica) will stay on the premises for 30 days to train and guide, introduce and assist, and help with whatever else is needed to make the new owners comfortable and confident in moving forward. It will also be the time to make sure you all are WELL cared for during the transition, because that is the most important part.

This also means that it will be business as usual in the next couple weeks…we will be here to answer any questions or concerns you may have. Please don’t hesitate to ask when we see you, or by email, or call us. Just to reassure you all—any passes you have purchased are still valid and any on-site boarding arrangements you have made are being honored.

The new owners names are Chris and Rebecca (she calls herself Beck). Already easy—you only have to learn one new name =). Beck has been a licensed Vet Tech for the last 23 years and is currently managing a large veterinary clinic in Tucson. Chris has a degree in Business and has worked in Corporate Sales and Marketing for the last 25 years.

Please know how much each of you means to us. Without you, Dawg House would never have been the remarkable community that it currently is and will continue to be.

Thank you and we look forward to speaking with all of you in person,
Erica and Christopher

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Dawg House Dog Daycare
2201 N Stone Ave.
Tucson AZ 85705
(520) 903-2949
http://www.dawghouse.biz
https://dawghousedogdaycare.wordpress.com/

Dawg House 8th Birthday This Month!

Here’s an article and picture from summer 2004 when Dawg House was getting ready to open. Hard to believe we’re 8 years old now ~~ it’s all thanks to YOU, our supportive, loyal (and handsome) pack! We couldn’t do it without each and every one of you! WOOF! THANKS FOR EVERYTHING!

http://www.tucsonweekly.com/tucson/t-qanda/Content?oid=1077015

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Dawg House Talk of The Town Award

Yay Dawg House!

Hey, Dawg House won some sort of award! Thanks everybody for your kind words! We got four stars!

“How are Award Winners Chosen?  Our Research Department calculates scores through data obtained through a multitude of resources including online customer reviews and surveys, blogs, social networks, business rating services, and other honors and accolades. Only those with enough positive feedback, scores, ratings, awards and accolades to reach 4-5 stars will win this award.”

As a business rating service and publication company, Celebration Media U.S., along with Talk of the Town News, annually calculates CMUS Power Ratings™ based on a multitude of resources, including consumer-review websites and blogs, social networks, and other rating services and industry resources to determine the top consumer-rated businesses in the country.

Our 7th Anniversary!

Hey, congratulations to YOU! 

You helped us make it to our seventh birthday! That’s right – Dawg House opened its’ doors on August 20th, 2004, and we’re still barking about how great you and all of your dawgs are! Thanks for coming in, being a big part of our pack, and keeping things nice and fuzzy! WOOF!

and here’s a link back to our 5th anniversary post, which also links to an article the Tucson Weekly ran about us before we opened: Thirty Five In Dawg Years

Dawg Media

Hey! How are you? We haven’t been updating the blog much lately, but we haven’t forgotten, either. Sometimes ya just get busy. Plus, summer in Tucson is here, and things move a little more slowly when the heat sets in…

Anyway, we wanted to take a minute to ask for some help updating our Dawg Media. As you know, we have two picture pages on this blog, one with individual daycare dawg portraits (Gallery), and one with general daycare playtime pics (Dawgs Being Dawgs). We also have a You Tube Channel, where we post short videos of playtime here at Dawg House.

When you get a chance, click on those links and poke around. If you don’t see an individual portrait of your dawg, let us know and we’ll add one! If you don’t see a playtime pic of your dawg, let us know about that too! And if you don’t see a video of your dawg, send us a note! We’ll get right on it. You can leave a comment on the blawg pages or send us an email at: contact@dawghouse.biz

Dog Daycare Goals and Perceptions

Dawg House dawgs have individual and diverse personalities, levels of energy, play and relaxation styles, mental and physical stimulation needs. Under one big roof, in essentially one big indoor dog park, we work hard to address all those things. We also try to find out what your long and short-term goals are as the mom and dad, and work toward those!

1. Some dawgs have a ton of energy every day, all day, and need to “get out the crazies” with other dogs on a regular basis. These dogs play hard and fast at daycare and need a human referee to make sure they play safe.

2. Some dawgs are shy or introverted, and need some dawg-and-human time outside of what their mom and dad can provide on a regular basis. Daycare is all about socialization: we specifically work toward the positive socialization of dawgs in a pack environment. Being exposed to other dawgs and humans in an outside-of-the-home environment on a regular basis is important for building confidence and providing mental stimulation.

3. Some dawgs have boundary issues or other social quirks that could use adjustment or refining. Maybe they need reinforcement with training issues like jumping up on people, “demand” barking, a too-aggressive play style, or just learning how to play well with others. We work very hard at Dawg House, refining play styles and setting boundaries in a social environment. We also work hard reinforcing good play styles with positive feedback.

Most dawgs have a little of all of these things in their personalities. Most dawgs could use some reinforcement in their basic training (sit, stay, no bark, down, off), positive reinforcement in their play style (good job, Mr. Pickles!), social exposure to other dawgs in a supervised, safe pack environment, mental and physical stimulation, and just a nice change of scenery with friends.

We know that folks watch the Dawgie Cam from work and home, and often have questions or concerns about what they observe. On any given day, you can watch dawgs playing hard and fast, relaxing in a group nap session, sniffing and wrestling, and you can see how humans regulate these activities.

We get questions about what people see. Maybe Mr. Pickles doesn’t seem to be as perky as usual – this could be that they’re just easing into things, or waiting for a different group to play with, or just watching. Maybe Mr. Pickles hasn’t been on cam after a particularly aggressive play session – this could mean they’re resting in another area, or a human has given them a neutral ‘time out’ to regulate the energy level of the group. Maybe a wrestling match looks a little fierce – not to worry – a human is always paying attention, watching and listening for warnings that things might be too heated.

As “dog behaviorists” we do our best to address both long-term and short-term dog daycare goals. A short term goal might be “I need Mr. Pickles nice and tired tonight because I’m having people over for dinner.” A long term goal might be “Mr. Pickles has been skittish around other dogs, and I want to make sure to reinforce positive interactions with him by bringing him to daycare.”

There are some mis-conceptions about how this works, however. We do try to communicate to new clients that it is best to bring your dog regularly in order that they get used to dog daycare, the pack environment, the human referees, and all that goes with the daily cycle. As dogs become regulars, we try to reinforce longer-term goals like basic training commands, positive play, and how to adjust to an ever-changing pack. Dawgs do need to come on a regular basis in order for these reinforcements to become natural and habitual. They forget, and they get out of practice. A skittish dog that takes a couple of weeks off or has a bad experience at the dog park or on a walk may take a few steps back and need to catch up on their confidence all over. We don’t pressure folks to come more often, but we do emphasize the importance of positive, regular social exposure.

More on how these things work in future blog posts… and we’d love to hear feedback from you!

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